Tag Archives: good news

A Bit of Bright News in The Chicago Home Market

//realestatestatistics.com/happynews/, reports what seems like positive news about the housing industry.

Taken with a grain of salt, the web site, http://realestatestatistics.com/happynews/, reports what seems like positive news about the housing industry.

With all the economic, financial and credit turmoil that seems to be in the news lately, the web site, Happy Real Estate News, discloses actual, reported home sales- and price-related data.

Created and maintain by IMS, a researcher for the real estate industry, the information presented there seems to be a breath of fresh air in what has unfortunately become somewhat dismal situation.

For instance, if you’re a homeowner in Chicago considering a move to Eastgate Village (or even an Eastgate Village resident thinking about selling your home), here’s some encouraging statistics:

According to the last update on the Happy Real Estate News web site (July 17th), the number of homes sold in Chicago rose 3.1%. The timeframe of the data on the site is a bit vague, so we’d assume this is for June or even May of this year.

Other encouraging news is that the average number of days that a home in Chicago is on the market has fallen by 2.9% (according to August 18 data), while the average Chicago home’s value rose 1.4% (reported September 5th).

In any event, the web site seems to report some heartening news. Take it with a grain of salt, however — the site doesn’t cite its source and, of course, there’s no guarantee your circumstance will be the same or even similar.

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Freddie & Fannie: What’s the Bailout Mean?

The recent bailout of two financial giants is most likely good news for consumers.

The recent bailout of two financial giants is most likely good news for consumers.

Unless you’ve been under a financial rock the past week or so, doubtless you know of the federal government’s announcement that it would bail out two of the nation’s largest mortgage holders (by some accounts, they hold 50% of all mortgages in the U.S.), Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae.

But what does this mean for buyers? Noted below are some recent comments from real estate, mortgage and economic experts, though the general opinion is that the move will serve to stabilize the credit market and make any future declines in selling prices probably lower than they would have been had the bailout not taken place.

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